en
WELCOME TO A PLACE WHERE ALL NEW IDEAS ARE SIGNIFICANT

"The Other Way"
WHAT WE DO
WE ARE HERE TO INVEST IN BUSINESSES

Fakher Holding has been established with the aim of creating a business ecosystem in the specialized fields of post, logistics, e-commerce, manufacturing and trades. Our main goal is creation of new businesses in aforementioned fields and provide products and services in the context of those businesses. Beside creation of new job opportunities, Fakher holding task is creation of appropriate infrastructure, based on information Technology which will result to life welfare level upgrade. Our main strategy is to attract creative ideas, investors, advisers and experts. We endeavor to take solid step towards our mission to upgrade Iran’s economy and welfare.

ABOUT FAKHER
WE ARE A HOLDING AND INVESTMENT COMPANY

Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem and strategic management of her subsidiaries and affiliates. Fakher holding is determined to create new businesses and develop appropriate infrastructure, to form a comprehensive exchange of values among people, government and suppliers of goods and services.

HOLDING
INVESTMENT
Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem
We embrace new thoughts, concepts and ideas. Our value is to thrive, nourish and shape quality businesses and empower Fakher ecosystem.
WHO WE ARE

Fakher holding considers the organizational culture, as a sharable and transferable pattern. Special architecture of human resources, tailored to the goals of the Holding, directs realization of the new organizational concepts.

HR STRATEGY
• Attracting professional human resources
• Engagement
• Continuous staff training and development
• Knowledge management
• Focus on employee wellbeing
• Rewarding
• Employee relations
OUR CULTURE
Fakher Holding’s organizational culture is based on shared values such as creativity, entrepreneurship, coaching and social responsibility which influences the organization’s members’ manner and mindset.
+ 1
Projects under execution
+ 1
Number of attained businesses
+ 1k
Direct employment
+ 1k
Indirect employment
1
startups
FAKHER HOLDING AT A GLANCE

ANNUAL REVIEW

11% Trades and Manufacturing 36% E-Commerce 53% Logistic
2020-04-05

Omnichannel

How to do Omnichannel Marketing (Without Being Creepy),Sarah Boesveld

You know Tia pretty well. She’s 32, has one child (who arrived fairly recently, based on all the onesies, soothers and burp cloths she’s purchased), lives in a suburb of Minneapolis-St. Paul’s (Eden Prairie) with her husband (they got hitched three years ago, according to her Pinterest board) and she loves hiking and kayaking (in fact, she posted a picture at the lake last weekend on Instagram).

But you’ve never met Tia—and she sure doesn’t know you. While Tia understands that marketers pick up information about her while she scrolls her phone or chirps requests at her Alexa, she doesn’t really know the scope of it. Is it merely convenient that she got a text with a coupon the minute she stepped into your store? Or is it actually kind of invasive? The last thing a retailer wants to do is freak out a customer.

Retailers today have never been equipped with more in their marketing toolkit. The rise of omnichannel marketing—which creates a seamless customer experience whether they’re in a brick-and-mortar store or scrolling through Instagram—helps retailers meet shoppers wherever they are. And studies show that it can really drive sales—a 2017 Harvard Business School study found omnichannel shoppers spent 4% more in store and 10% more online.

Read More:How to do Omnichannel Marketing (Without Being Creepy)

2020-03-23

Where Companies Go Wrong

Where Companies Go Wrong with Learning and DevelopmentHarvard Business Review ,Steve Glaveski,2019

Organizations spent $359 billion globally on training in 2016, but was it worth it?

Not when you consider the following:

  • 75% of 1,500 managers surveyed from across 50 organizations were dissatisfied with their company’s Learning & Development (L&D) function;
  • 70% of employees report that they don’t have mastery of the skills needed to do their jobs;
  • Only 12% of employees apply new skills learned in L&D programs to their jobs; and
  • Only 25% of respondents to a recent McKinsey survey believe that training measurably improved performance.

Not only is the majority of training in today’s companies ineffective, but the purpose, timing, and content of training is flawed.

Learning for the Wrong Reasons

Bryan Caplan, professor of economics at George Mason University, and author of The Case Against Education, says in his book that education often isn’t so much about learning useful job skills, but about people showing off, or “signaling.”

Today’s employees often signal through continuous professional education (CPE) credits so that they can make a case for a promotion. L&D staff also signal their worth by meeting flawed KPIs, such as the total CPE credits employees earn, rather than focusing on the business impact created. The former is easier to measure, but flawed incentives beget flawed outcomes, such as the following:

We’re learning at the wrong time. People learn best when they have to 

earn. Applying what’s learned to real-world situations strengthens one’s focus and determination to learn. And while psychologist Edwin Locke showed the impact of short feedback loops back in 1968 with his theory of motivation, it’s still not widely practiced when it comes to corporate training. Today’s employees often learn uniform topics, on L&D’s schedule, and at a time when it bears little immediate relevance to their role — and their learning suffers as a result.

We’re learning the wrong things. Want to see eyes glaze over quicker than you can finish this sentence? Mandate that busy employees attend a training session on “business writing skills”, or “conflict resolution”, or some other such course with little alignment to their needs.

We quickly forget what we’ve learned. Like first year college students who forget 60% of what they learn in high school, studying merely to get the CPE credit suggests that employees, too, will quickly forget what they learn. German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus pioneered experimental studies of memory in the late 19th Century, culminating with his discovery of “The Forgetting Curve.” He found that if new information isn’t applied, we’ll forget about 75% of it after just six days.

GET IN TOUCH

LETS START A JOURNEY

Main Office: Unit 4, 4Th Floor, Fakher Building , No.12, West Taban st., Nelson Mandela Boulevard, Tehran-Iran
Tel: +98 (21) 8867 8225 – Fax: +98 (21) 8608 2871
Email: info@fakher.ir
WELCOME TO A PLACE WHERE ALL NEW IDEAS ARE SIGNIFICANT

"The Other Way"
SCROLL DOWN TO CONTINUE
WHAT WE DO
WE ARE HERE TO INVEST IN BUSINESSES

Fakher Holding has been established with the aim of creating a business ecosystem in the specialized fields of post, logistics, e-commerce, manufacturing and trades. Our main goal is creation of new businesses in aforementioned fields and provide products and services in the context of those businesses. Beside creation of new job opportunities, Fakher holding task is creation of appropriate infrastructure, based on information Technology which will result to life welfare level upgrade. Our main strategy is to attract creative ideas, investors, advisers and experts. We endeavor to take solid step towards our mission to upgrade Iran’s economy and welfare.

ABOUT FAKHER
WE ARE A HOLDING AND INVESTMENT COMPANY

Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem and strategic management of her subsidiaries and affiliates. Fakher holding is determined to create new businesses and develop appropriate infrastructure, to form a comprehensive exchange of values among people, government and suppliers of goods and services.

HOLDING
INVESTMENT
Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem
We embrace new thoughts, concepts and ideas. Our value is to thrive, nourish and shape quality businesses and empower Fakher ecosystem.
WHO WE ARE

Fakher holding considers the organizational culture, as a sharable and transferable pattern. Special architecture of human resources, tailored to the goals of the Holding, directs realization of the new organizational concepts.

HR STRATEGY
• Attracting professional human resources
• Engagement
• Continuous staff training and development
• Knowledge management
• Focus on employee wellbeing
• Rewarding
• Employee relations
OUR CULTURE
Fakher Holding’s organizational culture is based on shared values such as creativity, entrepreneurship, coaching and social responsibility which influences the organization’s members’ manner and mindset.
+ 1
Projects under execution
+ 1
Number of attained businesses
+ 1k
Direct employment
+ 1k
Indirect employment
1
startups
11% Trades and Manufacturing 36% E-Commerce 53% Logistic
FAKHER HOLDING AT A GLANCE

ANNUAL REVIEW

2020-04-05

Omnichannel

How to do Omnichannel Marketing (Without Being Creepy),Sarah Boesveld

You know Tia pretty well. She’s 32, has one child (who arrived fairly recently, based on all the onesies, soothers and burp cloths she’s purchased), lives in a suburb of Minneapolis-St. Paul’s (Eden Prairie) with her husband (they got hitched three years ago, according to her Pinterest board) and she loves hiking and kayaking (in fact, she posted a picture at the lake last weekend on Instagram).

But you’ve never met Tia—and she sure doesn’t know you. While Tia understands that marketers pick up information about her while she scrolls her phone or chirps requests at her Alexa, she doesn’t really know the scope of it. Is it merely convenient that she got a text with a coupon the minute she stepped into your store? Or is it actually kind of invasive? The last thing a retailer wants to do is freak out a customer.

Retailers today have never been equipped with more in their marketing toolkit. The rise of omnichannel marketing—which creates a seamless customer experience whether they’re in a brick-and-mortar store or scrolling through Instagram—helps retailers meet shoppers wherever they are. And studies show that it can really drive sales—a 2017 Harvard Business School study found omnichannel shoppers spent 4% more in store and 10% more online.

Read More:How to do Omnichannel Marketing (Without Being Creepy)

2020-03-23

Where Companies Go Wrong

Where Companies Go Wrong with Learning and DevelopmentHarvard Business Review ,Steve Glaveski,2019

Organizations spent $359 billion globally on training in 2016, but was it worth it?

Not when you consider the following:

  • 75% of 1,500 managers surveyed from across 50 organizations were dissatisfied with their company’s Learning & Development (L&D) function;
  • 70% of employees report that they don’t have mastery of the skills needed to do their jobs;
  • Only 12% of employees apply new skills learned in L&D programs to their jobs; and
  • Only 25% of respondents to a recent McKinsey survey believe that training measurably improved performance.

Not only is the majority of training in today’s companies ineffective, but the purpose, timing, and content of training is flawed.

Learning for the Wrong Reasons

Bryan Caplan, professor of economics at George Mason University, and author of The Case Against Education, says in his book that education often isn’t so much about learning useful job skills, but about people showing off, or “signaling.”

Today’s employees often signal through continuous professional education (CPE) credits so that they can make a case for a promotion. L&D staff also signal their worth by meeting flawed KPIs, such as the total CPE credits employees earn, rather than focusing on the business impact created. The former is easier to measure, but flawed incentives beget flawed outcomes, such as the following:

We’re learning at the wrong time. People learn best when they have to 

earn. Applying what’s learned to real-world situations strengthens one’s focus and determination to learn. And while psychologist Edwin Locke showed the impact of short feedback loops back in 1968 with his theory of motivation, it’s still not widely practiced when it comes to corporate training. Today’s employees often learn uniform topics, on L&D’s schedule, and at a time when it bears little immediate relevance to their role — and their learning suffers as a result.

We’re learning the wrong things. Want to see eyes glaze over quicker than you can finish this sentence? Mandate that busy employees attend a training session on “business writing skills”, or “conflict resolution”, or some other such course with little alignment to their needs.

We quickly forget what we’ve learned. Like first year college students who forget 60% of what they learn in high school, studying merely to get the CPE credit suggests that employees, too, will quickly forget what they learn. German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus pioneered experimental studies of memory in the late 19th Century, culminating with his discovery of “The Forgetting Curve.” He found that if new information isn’t applied, we’ll forget about 75% of it after just six days.

Where Companies Go Wrong

Organizations spent $359 billion globally on training in 2016, but was it worth it?

Not when you consider the following:

  • 75% of 1,500 managers surveyed from across 50 organizations were dissatisfied with their company’s Learning & Development (L&D) function;
  • 70% of employees report that they don’t have mastery of the skills needed to do their jobs;
  • Only 12% of employees apply new skills learned in L&D programs to their jobs; and
  • Only 25% of respondents to a recent McKinsey survey believe that training measurably improved performance.

Not only is the majority of training in today’s companies ineffective, but the purpose, timing, and content of training is flawed.

Learning for the Wrong Reasons

Bryan Caplan, professor of economics at George Mason University, and author of The Case Against Education, says in his book that education often isn’t so much about learning useful job skills, but about people showing off, or “signaling.”

Today’s employees often signal through continuous professional education (CPE) credits so that they can make a case for a promotion. L&D staff also signal their worth by meeting flawed KPIs, such as the total CPE credits employees earn, rather than focusing on the business impact created. The former is easier to measure, but flawed incentives beget flawed outcomes, such as the following:

We’re learning at the wrong time. People learn best when they have to 

earn. Applying what’s learned to real-world situations strengthens one’s focus and determination to learn. And while psychologist Edwin Locke showed the impact of short feedback loops back in 1968 with his theory of motivation, it’s still not widely practiced when it comes to corporate training. Today’s employees often learn uniform topics, on L&D’s schedule, and at a time when it bears little immediate relevance to their role — and their learning suffers as a result.

We’re learning the wrong things. Want to see eyes glaze over quicker than you can finish this sentence? Mandate that busy employees attend a training session on “business writing skills”, or “conflict resolution”, or some other such course with little alignment to their needs.

We quickly forget what we’ve learned. Like first year college students who forget 60% of what they learn in high school, studying merely to get the CPE credit suggests that employees, too, will quickly forget what they learn. German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus pioneered experimental studies of memory in the late 19th Century, culminating with his discovery of “The Forgetting Curve.” He found that if new information isn’t applied, we’ll forget about 75% of it after just six days.

BACK
GET IN TOUCH

LETS START A JOURNEY

Main Office: Unit 4, 4Th Floor, Fakher Building , No.12, West Taban st., Nelson Mandela Boulevard, Tehran-Iran
Tel: +98 (21) 8867 8225 – Fax: +98 (21) 8608 2871
Email: info@fakher.ir
2019 © Fakher Holding. All Rights Reserved.
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