en
WELCOME TO A PLACE WHERE ALL NEW IDEAS ARE SIGNIFICANT
WHAT WE DO
WE ARE HERE TO INVEST IN BUSINESSES

Fakher Holding has been established with the aim of creating a business ecosystem in the specialized fields of post, logistics, e-commerce, manufacturing and trades. Our main goal is creation of new businesses in aforementioned fields and provide products and services in the context of those businesses. Beside creation of new job opportunities, Fakher holding task is creation of appropriate infrastructure, based on information Technology which will result to life welfare level upgrade. Our main strategy is to attract creative ideas, investors, advisers and experts. We endeavor to take solid step towards our mission to upgrade Iran’s economy and welfare.

ABOUT FAKHER
WE ARE A HOLDING AND INVESTMENT COMPANY

Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem and strategic management of her subsidiaries and affiliates. Fakher holding is determined to create new businesses and develop appropriate infrastructure, to form a comprehensive exchange of values among people, government and suppliers of goods and services.

HOLDING
INVESTMENT
Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem
We embrace new thoughts, concepts and ideas. Our value is to thrive, nourish and shape quality businesses and empower Fakher ecosystem.
WHO WE ARE

Fakher holding considers the organizational culture, as a sharable and transferable pattern. Special architecture of human resources, tailored to the goals of the Holding, directs realization of the new organizational concepts.

HR STRATEGY
• Attracting professional human resources
• Engagement
• Continuous staff training and development
• Knowledge management
• Focus on employee wellbeing
• Rewarding
• Employee relations
OUR CULTURE
Fakher Holding’s organizational culture is based on shared values such as creativity, entrepreneurship, coaching and social responsibility which influences the organization’s members’ manner and mindset.
+ 1
Projects under execution
+ 1
Number of attained businesses
+ 1k
Direct employment
+ 1k
Indirect employment
1
startups
FAKHER HOLDING AT A GLANCE

ANNUAL REVIEW

11% Trades and Manufacturing 36% E-Commerce 53% Logistic
2019-12-31

5G

5G: FIVE THINGS IT MEANS FOR LOGISTICS,DHL Magazine,April 2019

The fifth generation of cellular internet connectivity is set to be the supercharged gateway to a smarter and more connected logistics world.

With the promise of unstoppable data download and upload speeds, broader coverage and more stable connections, 5G, the fifth-generation cellular technology, is set to transform mobile connectivity as we know it.

Already, 5G is expected to revolutionize supply chains around the world as it becomes available in more markets over the next few years.

More companies are shifting toward a data-driven mindset in their decision making — to predict future performance and optimize operational efficiencies — which will require the collection and analysis of a large swath of data, some in real-time.

Exponentially faster data speeds and reduced latency will give rise to a more responsive network to support this transformation, while also paving the way for more Internet-enabled smart devices to be integrated along the logistics supply chain. This will render logistics processes faster, safer and more reliable.

Here is a look at what 5G will mean for logistics in five ways.

1. LOGISTICS, DIGITALIZED

With more smart devices — from temperature-monitoring sensors to autonomous vehicles — latching onto the finite frequencies of older cellular networks, mobile network operators are running out of usable radio channels on current spectrums.

But the issue of limited spaces for more devices on the network will soon be a thing of the past, as 5G is able to connect more users than its predecessors. In fact, for every meter of coverage, 5G is able to support over 1,000 more devices as compared to 4G at speeds of up to 10 gigabits per second (10Gbps), or 100 times faster.

With faster speeds, lower lag times, larger areas of coverage and a comparatively smaller power appetite, smart devices can communicate faster with one another at speeds that are even closer to real-time. This will catalyze the use of time-sensitive Internet of Things (IoT) device applications and open up opportunities for new use-cases in logistics and beyond.

With IoT forecasted to open up a US$1.9 trillion (€1.65 trillion) opportunity in logistics, 5G is one of the key enablers to facilitate data-driven analytics and decision making with big data and artificial intelligence.

https://logisticsofthings.dhl/5g-five-things-it-means-for-logistics/

2019-12-16

Cross-Silo Leadership

Though most executives recognize the importance of breaking down silos to help people collaborate across boundaries, they struggle to make it happen.That’s understandable: It is devilishly difficult. Think about your own relationships at work—the people you report to and those who report to you, for starters. Now consider the people in other functions, units, or geographies whose work touches yours in some way. Which relationships get prioritized in your day-to-day job?-Tiziana CasciaroAmy C. EdmondsonSujin Jang,June 2019

We’ve posed that question to managers, engineers, salespeople, and consultants in companies around the world. The response we get is almost always the same: vertical relationships.

But when we ask, “Which relationships are most important for creating value for customers?” the answers flip. Today the vast majority of innovation and business-development opportunities lie in the interfaces between functions, offices, or organizations. In short, the integrated solutions that most customers want—but companies wrestle with developing—require horizontal collaboration.

The value of horizontal teamwork is widely recognized. Employees who can reach outside their silos to find colleagues with complementary expertise learn more, sell more, and gain skills faster. Harvard’s Heidi Gardner has found that firms with more cross-boundary collaboration achieve greater customer loyalty and higher margins. As innovation hinges more and more on interdisciplinary cooperation, digitalization transforms business at a breakneck pace, and globalization increasingly requires people to work across national borders, the demand for executives who can lead projects at interfaces keeps rising.

Our research and consulting work with hundreds of executives and managers in dozens of organizations confirms both the need for and the challenge of horizontal collaboration. “There’s no doubt. We should focus on big projects that call for integration across practices,” a partner in a global accounting firm told us. “That’s where our greatest distinctive value is developed. But most of us confine ourselves to the smaller projects that we can handle within our practice areas. It’s frustrating.” A senior partner in a leading consulting firm put it slightly differently: “You know you should swim farther to catch a bigger fish, but it is a lot easier to swim in your own pond and catch a bunch of small fish.”

One way to break down silos is to redesign the formal organizational structure. But that approach has limits: It’s costly, confusing, and slow. Worse, every new structure solves some problems but creates others. That’s why we’ve focused on identifying activities that facilitate boundary crossing. We’ve found that people can be trained to see and connect with pools of expertise throughout their organizations and to work better with colleagues who think very differently from them. The core challenges of operating effectively at interfaces are simple: learning about people on the other side and relating to them. But simple does not mean easy; human beings have always struggled to understand and relate to those who are different.

Leaders need to help people develop the capacity to overcome these challenges on both individual and organizational levels. That means providing training in and support for four practices that enable effective interface work.

1. Develop and Deploy Cultural Brokers

Fortunately, in most companies there are people who already excel at interface collaboration. They usually have experiences and relationships that span multiple sectors, functions, or domains and informally serve as links between them. We call these people cultural brokers. In studies involving more than 2,000 global teams, one of us—Sujin—found that diverse teams containing a cultural broker significantly outperformed diverse teams without one. (See “The Most Creative Teams Have a Specific Type of Cultural Diversity,” HBR.org, July 24, 2018.) Companies should identify these individuals and help them increase their impact.

Cultural brokers promote cross-boundary work in one of two ways: by acting as a bridge or as an adhesive.

A bridge offers himself as a go-between, allowing people in different functions or geographies to collaborate with minimal disruption to their day-to-day routine. Bridges are most effective when they have considerable knowledge of both sides and can figure out what each one needs. This is why the champagne and spirits distributor Moët Hennessy España hired two enologists, or wine experts, to help coordinate the work of its marketing and sales groups, which had a history of miscommunication and conflict. The enologists could relate to both groups equally: They could speak to marketers about the emotional content (the ephemeral “bouquet”) of brands, while also providing pragmatic salespeople with details on the distinctive features of products they needed to win over retailers. Understanding both worlds, the enologists were able to communicate the rationale for each group’s modus operandi to the other, allowing marketing and sales to work more synergistically even without directly interacting. This kind of cultural brokerage is efficient because it lets disparate parties work around differences without investing in learning the other side’s perspective or changing how they work. It’s especially valuable for one-off collaborations or when the company is under intense time pressure to deliver results.

Employees who can reach outside their silos learn more and sell more.

Adhesives, in contrast, bring people together and help build mutual understanding and lasting relationships. Take one manager we spoke with at National Instruments, a global producer of automated test equipment. He frequently connects colleagues from different regions and functions. “I think of it as building up the relationships between them,” he told us. “If a colleague needs to work with someone in another office or function, I would tell them, ‘OK, here’s the person to call.’ Then I’d take the time to sit down and say, ‘Well, let me tell you a little bit about how these guys work.’” Adhesives facilitate collaboration by vouching for people and helping them decipher one another’s language. Unlike bridges, adhesives develop others’ capacity to work across a boundary in the future without their assistance.

 

Company leaders can build both bridging and adhesive capabilities in their organizations by hiring people with multifunctional or multicultural backgrounds who have the strong interpersonal skills needed to build rapport with multiple parties. Because it takes resilience to work with people across cultural divides, firms should also look for a growth mindset—the desire to learn and to take on challenges and “stretch” opportunities.

In addition, leaders can develop more brokers by giving people at all levels the chance to move into roles that expose them to multiple parts of the company. This, by the way, is good training for general managers and is what many rotational leadership-development programs aim to accomplish. Claudine Wolfe, the head of talent and development at the global insurer Chubb, maintains that the company’s capacity to serve customers around the world rests on giving top performers opportunities to work in different geographies and cultivate an international mindset. “We give people their critical development experiences steeped in the job, in the region,” she says. “They get coaching in the cultural norms and the language, but then they live it and internalize it. They go to the local bodega, take notice of the products on the shelves, have conversations with the merchant, and learn what it really means to live in that environment.”

Matrix organizational structures, in which people report to two (or more) groups, can also help develop cultural brokers. Despite their inherent challenges (they can be infuriatingly hard to navigate without strong leadership and accountability), matrices get people used to operating at interfaces.

We’re not saying that everyone in your organization needs to be a full-fledged cultural broker. But consciously expanding the ranks of brokers and deploying them to grease the wheels of collaboration can go a long way.

Read More:https://hbr.org/2019/05/cross-silo-leadership

GET IN TOUCH

LETS START A JOURNEY

Main Office: Unit 4, 4Th Floor, Fakher Building , No.12, West Taban st., Nelson Mandela Boulevard, Tehran-Iran
Tel: +98 (21) 8867 8225 – Fax: +98 (21) 8608 2871
Email: info@fakher.ir
WELCOME TO A PLACE WHERE ALL NEW IDEAS ARE SIGNIFICANT
SCROLL DOWN TO CONTINUE
WHAT WE DO
WE ARE HERE TO INVEST IN BUSINESSES

Fakher Holding has been established with the aim of creating a business ecosystem in the specialized fields of post, logistics, e-commerce, manufacturing and trades. Our main goal is creation of new businesses in aforementioned fields and provide products and services in the context of those businesses. Beside creation of new job opportunities, Fakher holding task is creation of appropriate infrastructure, based on information Technology which will result to life welfare level upgrade. Our main strategy is to attract creative ideas, investors, advisers and experts. We endeavor to take solid step towards our mission to upgrade Iran’s economy and welfare.

ABOUT FAKHER
WE ARE A HOLDING AND INVESTMENT COMPANY

Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem and strategic management of her subsidiaries and affiliates. Fakher holding is determined to create new businesses and develop appropriate infrastructure, to form a comprehensive exchange of values among people, government and suppliers of goods and services.

HOLDING
INVESTMENT
Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem
We embrace new thoughts, concepts and ideas. Our value is to thrive, nourish and shape quality businesses and empower Fakher ecosystem.
WHO WE ARE

Fakher holding considers the organizational culture, as a sharable and transferable pattern. Special architecture of human resources, tailored to the goals of the Holding, directs realization of the new organizational concepts.

HR STRATEGY
• Attracting professional human resources
• Engagement
• Continuous staff training and development
• Knowledge management
• Focus on employee wellbeing
• Rewarding
• Employee relations
OUR CULTURE
Fakher Holding’s organizational culture is based on shared values such as creativity, entrepreneurship, coaching and social responsibility which influences the organization’s members’ manner and mindset.
+ 1
Projects under execution
+ 1
Number of attained businesses
+ 1k
Direct employment
+ 1k
Indirect employment
1
startups
11% Trades and Manufacturing 36% E-Commerce 53% Logistic
FAKHER HOLDING AT A GLANCE

ANNUAL REVIEW

2019-12-31

5G

5G: FIVE THINGS IT MEANS FOR LOGISTICS,DHL Magazine,April 2019

The fifth generation of cellular internet connectivity is set to be the supercharged gateway to a smarter and more connected logistics world.

With the promise of unstoppable data download and upload speeds, broader coverage and more stable connections, 5G, the fifth-generation cellular technology, is set to transform mobile connectivity as we know it.

Already, 5G is expected to revolutionize supply chains around the world as it becomes available in more markets over the next few years.

More companies are shifting toward a data-driven mindset in their decision making — to predict future performance and optimize operational efficiencies — which will require the collection and analysis of a large swath of data, some in real-time.

Exponentially faster data speeds and reduced latency will give rise to a more responsive network to support this transformation, while also paving the way for more Internet-enabled smart devices to be integrated along the logistics supply chain. This will render logistics processes faster, safer and more reliable.

Here is a look at what 5G will mean for logistics in five ways.

1. LOGISTICS, DIGITALIZED

With more smart devices — from temperature-monitoring sensors to autonomous vehicles — latching onto the finite frequencies of older cellular networks, mobile network operators are running out of usable radio channels on current spectrums.

But the issue of limited spaces for more devices on the network will soon be a thing of the past, as 5G is able to connect more users than its predecessors. In fact, for every meter of coverage, 5G is able to support over 1,000 more devices as compared to 4G at speeds of up to 10 gigabits per second (10Gbps), or 100 times faster.

With faster speeds, lower lag times, larger areas of coverage and a comparatively smaller power appetite, smart devices can communicate faster with one another at speeds that are even closer to real-time. This will catalyze the use of time-sensitive Internet of Things (IoT) device applications and open up opportunities for new use-cases in logistics and beyond.

With IoT forecasted to open up a US$1.9 trillion (€1.65 trillion) opportunity in logistics, 5G is one of the key enablers to facilitate data-driven analytics and decision making with big data and artificial intelligence.

https://logisticsofthings.dhl/5g-five-things-it-means-for-logistics/

2019-12-16

Cross-Silo Leadership

Though most executives recognize the importance of breaking down silos to help people collaborate across boundaries, they struggle to make it happen.That’s understandable: It is devilishly difficult. Think about your own relationships at work—the people you report to and those who report to you, for starters. Now consider the people in other functions, units, or geographies whose work touches yours in some way. Which relationships get prioritized in your day-to-day job?-Tiziana CasciaroAmy C. EdmondsonSujin Jang,June 2019

We’ve posed that question to managers, engineers, salespeople, and consultants in companies around the world. The response we get is almost always the same: vertical relationships.

But when we ask, “Which relationships are most important for creating value for customers?” the answers flip. Today the vast majority of innovation and business-development opportunities lie in the interfaces between functions, offices, or organizations. In short, the integrated solutions that most customers want—but companies wrestle with developing—require horizontal collaboration.

The value of horizontal teamwork is widely recognized. Employees who can reach outside their silos to find colleagues with complementary expertise learn more, sell more, and gain skills faster. Harvard’s Heidi Gardner has found that firms with more cross-boundary collaboration achieve greater customer loyalty and higher margins. As innovation hinges more and more on interdisciplinary cooperation, digitalization transforms business at a breakneck pace, and globalization increasingly requires people to work across national borders, the demand for executives who can lead projects at interfaces keeps rising.

Our research and consulting work with hundreds of executives and managers in dozens of organizations confirms both the need for and the challenge of horizontal collaboration. “There’s no doubt. We should focus on big projects that call for integration across practices,” a partner in a global accounting firm told us. “That’s where our greatest distinctive value is developed. But most of us confine ourselves to the smaller projects that we can handle within our practice areas. It’s frustrating.” A senior partner in a leading consulting firm put it slightly differently: “You know you should swim farther to catch a bigger fish, but it is a lot easier to swim in your own pond and catch a bunch of small fish.”

One way to break down silos is to redesign the formal organizational structure. But that approach has limits: It’s costly, confusing, and slow. Worse, every new structure solves some problems but creates others. That’s why we’ve focused on identifying activities that facilitate boundary crossing. We’ve found that people can be trained to see and connect with pools of expertise throughout their organizations and to work better with colleagues who think very differently from them. The core challenges of operating effectively at interfaces are simple: learning about people on the other side and relating to them. But simple does not mean easy; human beings have always struggled to understand and relate to those who are different.

Leaders need to help people develop the capacity to overcome these challenges on both individual and organizational levels. That means providing training in and support for four practices that enable effective interface work.

1. Develop and Deploy Cultural Brokers

Fortunately, in most companies there are people who already excel at interface collaboration. They usually have experiences and relationships that span multiple sectors, functions, or domains and informally serve as links between them. We call these people cultural brokers. In studies involving more than 2,000 global teams, one of us—Sujin—found that diverse teams containing a cultural broker significantly outperformed diverse teams without one. (See “The Most Creative Teams Have a Specific Type of Cultural Diversity,” HBR.org, July 24, 2018.) Companies should identify these individuals and help them increase their impact.

Cultural brokers promote cross-boundary work in one of two ways: by acting as a bridge or as an adhesive.

A bridge offers himself as a go-between, allowing people in different functions or geographies to collaborate with minimal disruption to their day-to-day routine. Bridges are most effective when they have considerable knowledge of both sides and can figure out what each one needs. This is why the champagne and spirits distributor Moët Hennessy España hired two enologists, or wine experts, to help coordinate the work of its marketing and sales groups, which had a history of miscommunication and conflict. The enologists could relate to both groups equally: They could speak to marketers about the emotional content (the ephemeral “bouquet”) of brands, while also providing pragmatic salespeople with details on the distinctive features of products they needed to win over retailers. Understanding both worlds, the enologists were able to communicate the rationale for each group’s modus operandi to the other, allowing marketing and sales to work more synergistically even without directly interacting. This kind of cultural brokerage is efficient because it lets disparate parties work around differences without investing in learning the other side’s perspective or changing how they work. It’s especially valuable for one-off collaborations or when the company is under intense time pressure to deliver results.

Employees who can reach outside their silos learn more and sell more.

Adhesives, in contrast, bring people together and help build mutual understanding and lasting relationships. Take one manager we spoke with at National Instruments, a global producer of automated test equipment. He frequently connects colleagues from different regions and functions. “I think of it as building up the relationships between them,” he told us. “If a colleague needs to work with someone in another office or function, I would tell them, ‘OK, here’s the person to call.’ Then I’d take the time to sit down and say, ‘Well, let me tell you a little bit about how these guys work.’” Adhesives facilitate collaboration by vouching for people and helping them decipher one another’s language. Unlike bridges, adhesives develop others’ capacity to work across a boundary in the future without their assistance.

 

Company leaders can build both bridging and adhesive capabilities in their organizations by hiring people with multifunctional or multicultural backgrounds who have the strong interpersonal skills needed to build rapport with multiple parties. Because it takes resilience to work with people across cultural divides, firms should also look for a growth mindset—the desire to learn and to take on challenges and “stretch” opportunities.

In addition, leaders can develop more brokers by giving people at all levels the chance to move into roles that expose them to multiple parts of the company. This, by the way, is good training for general managers and is what many rotational leadership-development programs aim to accomplish. Claudine Wolfe, the head of talent and development at the global insurer Chubb, maintains that the company’s capacity to serve customers around the world rests on giving top performers opportunities to work in different geographies and cultivate an international mindset. “We give people their critical development experiences steeped in the job, in the region,” she says. “They get coaching in the cultural norms and the language, but then they live it and internalize it. They go to the local bodega, take notice of the products on the shelves, have conversations with the merchant, and learn what it really means to live in that environment.”

Matrix organizational structures, in which people report to two (or more) groups, can also help develop cultural brokers. Despite their inherent challenges (they can be infuriatingly hard to navigate without strong leadership and accountability), matrices get people used to operating at interfaces.

We’re not saying that everyone in your organization needs to be a full-fledged cultural broker. But consciously expanding the ranks of brokers and deploying them to grease the wheels of collaboration can go a long way.

Read More:https://hbr.org/2019/05/cross-silo-leadership

Cross-Silo Leadership

We’ve posed that question to managers, engineers, salespeople, and consultants in companies around the world. The response we get is almost always the same: vertical relationships.

But when we ask, “Which relationships are most important for creating value for customers?” the answers flip. Today the vast majority of innovation and business-development opportunities lie in the interfaces between functions, offices, or organizations. In short, the integrated solutions that most customers want—but companies wrestle with developing—require horizontal collaboration.

The value of horizontal teamwork is widely recognized. Employees who can reach outside their silos to find colleagues with complementary expertise learn more, sell more, and gain skills faster. Harvard’s Heidi Gardner has found that firms with more cross-boundary collaboration achieve greater customer loyalty and higher margins. As innovation hinges more and more on interdisciplinary cooperation, digitalization transforms business at a breakneck pace, and globalization increasingly requires people to work across national borders, the demand for executives who can lead projects at interfaces keeps rising.

Our research and consulting work with hundreds of executives and managers in dozens of organizations confirms both the need for and the challenge of horizontal collaboration. “There’s no doubt. We should focus on big projects that call for integration across practices,” a partner in a global accounting firm told us. “That’s where our greatest distinctive value is developed. But most of us confine ourselves to the smaller projects that we can handle within our practice areas. It’s frustrating.” A senior partner in a leading consulting firm put it slightly differently: “You know you should swim farther to catch a bigger fish, but it is a lot easier to swim in your own pond and catch a bunch of small fish.”

One way to break down silos is to redesign the formal organizational structure. But that approach has limits: It’s costly, confusing, and slow. Worse, every new structure solves some problems but creates others. That’s why we’ve focused on identifying activities that facilitate boundary crossing. We’ve found that people can be trained to see and connect with pools of expertise throughout their organizations and to work better with colleagues who think very differently from them. The core challenges of operating effectively at interfaces are simple: learning about people on the other side and relating to them. But simple does not mean easy; human beings have always struggled to understand and relate to those who are different.

Leaders need to help people develop the capacity to overcome these challenges on both individual and organizational levels. That means providing training in and support for four practices that enable effective interface work.

1. Develop and Deploy Cultural Brokers

Fortunately, in most companies there are people who already excel at interface collaboration. They usually have experiences and relationships that span multiple sectors, functions, or domains and informally serve as links between them. We call these people cultural brokers. In studies involving more than 2,000 global teams, one of us—Sujin—found that diverse teams containing a cultural broker significantly outperformed diverse teams without one. (See “The Most Creative Teams Have a Specific Type of Cultural Diversity,” HBR.org, July 24, 2018.) Companies should identify these individuals and help them increase their impact.

Cultural brokers promote cross-boundary work in one of two ways: by acting as a bridge or as an adhesive.

A bridge offers himself as a go-between, allowing people in different functions or geographies to collaborate with minimal disruption to their day-to-day routine. Bridges are most effective when they have considerable knowledge of both sides and can figure out what each one needs. This is why the champagne and spirits distributor Moët Hennessy España hired two enologists, or wine experts, to help coordinate the work of its marketing and sales groups, which had a history of miscommunication and conflict. The enologists could relate to both groups equally: They could speak to marketers about the emotional content (the ephemeral “bouquet”) of brands, while also providing pragmatic salespeople with details on the distinctive features of products they needed to win over retailers. Understanding both worlds, the enologists were able to communicate the rationale for each group’s modus operandi to the other, allowing marketing and sales to work more synergistically even without directly interacting. This kind of cultural brokerage is efficient because it lets disparate parties work around differences without investing in learning the other side’s perspective or changing how they work. It’s especially valuable for one-off collaborations or when the company is under intense time pressure to deliver results.

Employees who can reach outside their silos learn more and sell more.

Adhesives, in contrast, bring people together and help build mutual understanding and lasting relationships. Take one manager we spoke with at National Instruments, a global producer of automated test equipment. He frequently connects colleagues from different regions and functions. “I think of it as building up the relationships between them,” he told us. “If a colleague needs to work with someone in another office or function, I would tell them, ‘OK, here’s the person to call.’ Then I’d take the time to sit down and say, ‘Well, let me tell you a little bit about how these guys work.’” Adhesives facilitate collaboration by vouching for people and helping them decipher one another’s language. Unlike bridges, adhesives develop others’ capacity to work across a boundary in the future without their assistance.

 

Company leaders can build both bridging and adhesive capabilities in their organizations by hiring people with multifunctional or multicultural backgrounds who have the strong interpersonal skills needed to build rapport with multiple parties. Because it takes resilience to work with people across cultural divides, firms should also look for a growth mindset—the desire to learn and to take on challenges and “stretch” opportunities.

In addition, leaders can develop more brokers by giving people at all levels the chance to move into roles that expose them to multiple parts of the company. This, by the way, is good training for general managers and is what many rotational leadership-development programs aim to accomplish. Claudine Wolfe, the head of talent and development at the global insurer Chubb, maintains that the company’s capacity to serve customers around the world rests on giving top performers opportunities to work in different geographies and cultivate an international mindset. “We give people their critical development experiences steeped in the job, in the region,” she says. “They get coaching in the cultural norms and the language, but then they live it and internalize it. They go to the local bodega, take notice of the products on the shelves, have conversations with the merchant, and learn what it really means to live in that environment.”

Matrix organizational structures, in which people report to two (or more) groups, can also help develop cultural brokers. Despite their inherent challenges (they can be infuriatingly hard to navigate without strong leadership and accountability), matrices get people used to operating at interfaces.

We’re not saying that everyone in your organization needs to be a full-fledged cultural broker. But consciously expanding the ranks of brokers and deploying them to grease the wheels of collaboration can go a long way.

Read More:https://hbr.org/2019/05/cross-silo-leadership

BACK
GET IN TOUCH

LETS START A JOURNEY

Main Office: Unit 4, 4Th Floor, Fakher Building , No.12, West Taban st., Nelson Mandela Boulevard, Tehran-Iran
Tel: +98 (21) 8867 8225 – Fax: +98 (21) 8608 2871
Email: info@fakher.ir
2019 © Fakher Holding. All Rights Reserved.
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