en
WELCOME TO A PLACE WHERE ALL NEW IDEAS ARE SIGNIFICANT
WHAT WE DO
WE ARE HERE TO INVEST IN BUSINESSES

Fakher Holding has been established with the aim of creating a business ecosystem in the specialized fields of post, logistics, e-commerce, manufacturing and trades. Our main goal is creation of new businesses in aforementioned fields and provide products and services in the context of those businesses. Beside creation of new job opportunities, Fakher holding task is creation of appropriate infrastructure, based on information Technology which will result to life welfare level upgrade. Our main strategy is to attract creative ideas, investors, advisers and experts. We endeavor to take solid step towards our mission to upgrade Iran’s economy and welfare.

ABOUT FAKHER
WE ARE A HOLDING AND INVESTMENT COMPANY

Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem and strategic management of her subsidiaries and affiliates. Fakher holding is determined to create new businesses and develop appropriate infrastructure, to form a comprehensive exchange of values among people, government and suppliers of goods and services.

HOLDING
INVESTMENT
Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem
We embrace new thoughts, concepts and ideas. Our value is to thrive, nourish and shape quality businesses and empower Fakher ecosystem.
WHO WE ARE

Fakher holding considers the organizational culture, as a sharable and transferable pattern. Special architecture of human resources, tailored to the goals of the Holding, directs realization of the new organizational concepts.

HR STRATEGY
• Attracting professional human resources
• Engagement
• Continuous staff training and development
• Knowledge management
• Focus on employee wellbeing
• Rewarding
• Employee relations
OUR CULTURE
Fakher Holding’s organizational culture is based on shared values such as creativity, entrepreneurship, coaching and social responsibility which influences the organization’s members’ manner and mindset.
+ 1
Projects under execution
+ 1
Number of attained businesses
+ 1k
Direct employment
+ 1k
Indirect employment
1
startups
FAKHER HOLDING AT A GLANCE

ANNUAL REVIEW

11% Trades and Manufacturing 36% E-Commerce 53% Logistic
2019-12-01

The top 10 supply chain risks of 2019

Modern supply chains are more complex and global than ever before. But that also leaves them open to a wider variety of risks and disruptions. Here are ten risks to track for the coming year,Tobias Larsson and Shehrina Kamal,2019

The modern economy relies on the smooth operation of complex and sophisticated supply chains. The ability to move materials, components, and finished products in a timely and efficient manner has delivered benefits for many: reducing the cost of manufactured products, improving access to advanced technologies or life-saving medicines, and opening new markets and new business opportunities for producers.

Yet modern supply chains are also vulnerable. Transportation delays, theft, natural disasters, inclement weather, cyberattacks, and unexpected quality issues can disrupt cargo flows, creating short-term costs and delivery challenges. And shifts in local, national, and international trade and regulatory policies can upset the fundamental economics of established supply chains. Below is a list of trends that you should keep an eye onduring the upcoming year, examining their implications for your supply chain network.

1. TRADE WARS

Global trade tensions have led to the imposition of new import tariffs on a wide range of consumer products and industrial components. While the biggest fight has been between the United States and China, other countries and regions, notably the European Union (EU), have also been drawn into the fray. As the impact of the new arrangements begins to bite, companies are starting to adapt their supply chains in response.

In June 2018, U.S. motorcycle maker Harley Davidson announced that manufacturing of products destined for EU markets would be switched from U.S. factories to facilities in Brazil and Thailand. We expect this trend to accelerate in 2019, especially asthe U.S. and China introduce further tariffs and the United Kingdom and EU fail to agree on an orderly Brexit. German carmaker BMW has already announced that it is considering transferring production of its Mini brand from the U.K. to the Netherlands andplans to make SUVs for Chinese customers at plants inside the country. Honda also announced that it will be shutting down its flagship plant in Swindon, U.K., by 2021.

2. RAW MATERIAL SHORTAGES

While companies are increasingly pursuing local or regional manufacturing strategies for finished products, the production of many key raw materials remains highly globalized. As such, supply of some key materials is vulnerable to widespread disruption caused by demand spikes or production bottlenecks. At the end of 2018, plastics suppliers across Europe warned of impending critical shortages of certain polyamide materials, which are used in the production of engineered plastic components such as car parts. The issue is rooted in the low supply of adiponitrile (ADN), a precursor chemical. ADN is manufactured at only five plants in the world, and shortages have been driven by operational problems and maintenance shutdowns. Companies in the automotive, textile, electronics, and packaging industries may be forced to switch to other products, at least temporarily, although this may not always be possible.

An area of growing concern over the longer term is the materials used in lithium-ion batteries, which are used in a wide range of high-value products from mobile phones to electric cars. The German Mineral Resources Agency forecasts that demand for lithium will quadruple by 2035. And because two-thirds of the world's supply of cobalt, another essential component in lithium-ion batteries, is mined in Congo, some experts believe that instability in the region could drive a supply shortage in the near future. To secure their supply chains, Apple and some car manufacturers have already started to purchase cobalt directly on behalf of their battery suppliers.

Read More:https://www.supplychainquarterly.com/topics/Strategy/20190514-the-top-10-supply-chain-risks-of-2019/

2019-11-27

Business Models

Business Models Aren’t Just For Business,Saul Kaplan,April 2011

During my six years as an accidental bureaucrat, after spending twenty-five years in the private sector, my friends often wondered how I could do it. They routinely asked versions of the question: doesn’t government move too slowly for you? My standard reply was that, yes, the public sector moves slowly — but then, big companies don’t move so quickly either. And come to think of it, I teased my friends in higher education, colleges and universities move more slowly than either business or government! The point is, all institutions move slowly.

What surprised me wasn’t how slowly the different institutions moved, but the different language, behavior, secret handshakes, and views of each other I found across sectors. Xenophobia runs rampant within public, private, non-profit, and for-profit silos. Each silo has created its own world completely foreign to inhabitants from other sectors. Visiting emissaries are always viewed with skepticism. (“I’m from the government and I’m here to help …”)

One epiphany from my immersion into the non-private sector is how strenuously social sector organizations resist the notion they have a “business model.” Non-profits, government agencies, social enterprises, schools, and NGOs consistently proclaim that they aren’t businesses, and therefore business rules don’t apply.

Well, I’m sorry to break the news, but if an organization has a viable way to create, deliver, and capture value, it has a business model. It doesn’t matter whether an organization is in the public or private sector. It doesn’t matter if it’s a non-profit or a for-profit enterprise. All organizations have a business model. Non-profit corporations may not be providing a financial return to investors or owners, but they still capture value to finance activities with contributions, grants, and service revenue. Social enterprises may be mission-driven, focused on delivering social impact versus a financial return on investment, but they still need a sustainable model to scale. Government agencies are financed by taxes, fees, and service revenue, but are still accountable to deliver citizen value at scale.

Read More:https://hbr.org/2011/04/business-models-arent-just-for

GET IN TOUCH

LETS START A JOURNEY

Main Office: Unit 4, 4Th Floor, Fakher Building , No.12, West Taban st., Nelson Mandela Boulevard, Tehran-Iran
Tel: +98 (21) 8867 8225 – Fax: +98 (21) 8608 2871
Email: info@fakher.ir
WELCOME TO A PLACE WHERE ALL NEW IDEAS ARE SIGNIFICANT
SCROLL DOWN TO CONTINUE
WHAT WE DO
WE ARE HERE TO INVEST IN BUSINESSES

Fakher Holding has been established with the aim of creating a business ecosystem in the specialized fields of post, logistics, e-commerce, manufacturing and trades. Our main goal is creation of new businesses in aforementioned fields and provide products and services in the context of those businesses. Beside creation of new job opportunities, Fakher holding task is creation of appropriate infrastructure, based on information Technology which will result to life welfare level upgrade. Our main strategy is to attract creative ideas, investors, advisers and experts. We endeavor to take solid step towards our mission to upgrade Iran’s economy and welfare.

ABOUT FAKHER
WE ARE A HOLDING AND INVESTMENT COMPANY

Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem and strategic management of her subsidiaries and affiliates. Fakher holding is determined to create new businesses and develop appropriate infrastructure, to form a comprehensive exchange of values among people, government and suppliers of goods and services.

HOLDING
INVESTMENT
Fakher Holding has been established with the mission of formation and management of Fakher ecosystem
We embrace new thoughts, concepts and ideas. Our value is to thrive, nourish and shape quality businesses and empower Fakher ecosystem.
WHO WE ARE

Fakher holding considers the organizational culture, as a sharable and transferable pattern. Special architecture of human resources, tailored to the goals of the Holding, directs realization of the new organizational concepts.

HR STRATEGY
• Attracting professional human resources
• Engagement
• Continuous staff training and development
• Knowledge management
• Focus on employee wellbeing
• Rewarding
• Employee relations
OUR CULTURE
Fakher Holding’s organizational culture is based on shared values such as creativity, entrepreneurship, coaching and social responsibility which influences the organization’s members’ manner and mindset.
+ 1
Projects under execution
+ 1
Number of attained businesses
+ 1k
Direct employment
+ 1k
Indirect employment
1
startups
11% Trades and Manufacturing 36% E-Commerce 53% Logistic
FAKHER HOLDING AT A GLANCE

ANNUAL REVIEW

2019-12-01

The top 10 supply chain risks of 2019

Modern supply chains are more complex and global than ever before. But that also leaves them open to a wider variety of risks and disruptions. Here are ten risks to track for the coming year,Tobias Larsson and Shehrina Kamal,2019

The modern economy relies on the smooth operation of complex and sophisticated supply chains. The ability to move materials, components, and finished products in a timely and efficient manner has delivered benefits for many: reducing the cost of manufactured products, improving access to advanced technologies or life-saving medicines, and opening new markets and new business opportunities for producers.

Yet modern supply chains are also vulnerable. Transportation delays, theft, natural disasters, inclement weather, cyberattacks, and unexpected quality issues can disrupt cargo flows, creating short-term costs and delivery challenges. And shifts in local, national, and international trade and regulatory policies can upset the fundamental economics of established supply chains. Below is a list of trends that you should keep an eye onduring the upcoming year, examining their implications for your supply chain network.

1. TRADE WARS

Global trade tensions have led to the imposition of new import tariffs on a wide range of consumer products and industrial components. While the biggest fight has been between the United States and China, other countries and regions, notably the European Union (EU), have also been drawn into the fray. As the impact of the new arrangements begins to bite, companies are starting to adapt their supply chains in response.

In June 2018, U.S. motorcycle maker Harley Davidson announced that manufacturing of products destined for EU markets would be switched from U.S. factories to facilities in Brazil and Thailand. We expect this trend to accelerate in 2019, especially asthe U.S. and China introduce further tariffs and the United Kingdom and EU fail to agree on an orderly Brexit. German carmaker BMW has already announced that it is considering transferring production of its Mini brand from the U.K. to the Netherlands andplans to make SUVs for Chinese customers at plants inside the country. Honda also announced that it will be shutting down its flagship plant in Swindon, U.K., by 2021.

2. RAW MATERIAL SHORTAGES

While companies are increasingly pursuing local or regional manufacturing strategies for finished products, the production of many key raw materials remains highly globalized. As such, supply of some key materials is vulnerable to widespread disruption caused by demand spikes or production bottlenecks. At the end of 2018, plastics suppliers across Europe warned of impending critical shortages of certain polyamide materials, which are used in the production of engineered plastic components such as car parts. The issue is rooted in the low supply of adiponitrile (ADN), a precursor chemical. ADN is manufactured at only five plants in the world, and shortages have been driven by operational problems and maintenance shutdowns. Companies in the automotive, textile, electronics, and packaging industries may be forced to switch to other products, at least temporarily, although this may not always be possible.

An area of growing concern over the longer term is the materials used in lithium-ion batteries, which are used in a wide range of high-value products from mobile phones to electric cars. The German Mineral Resources Agency forecasts that demand for lithium will quadruple by 2035. And because two-thirds of the world's supply of cobalt, another essential component in lithium-ion batteries, is mined in Congo, some experts believe that instability in the region could drive a supply shortage in the near future. To secure their supply chains, Apple and some car manufacturers have already started to purchase cobalt directly on behalf of their battery suppliers.

Read More:https://www.supplychainquarterly.com/topics/Strategy/20190514-the-top-10-supply-chain-risks-of-2019/

2019-11-27

Business Models

Business Models Aren’t Just For Business,Saul Kaplan,April 2011

During my six years as an accidental bureaucrat, after spending twenty-five years in the private sector, my friends often wondered how I could do it. They routinely asked versions of the question: doesn’t government move too slowly for you? My standard reply was that, yes, the public sector moves slowly — but then, big companies don’t move so quickly either. And come to think of it, I teased my friends in higher education, colleges and universities move more slowly than either business or government! The point is, all institutions move slowly.

What surprised me wasn’t how slowly the different institutions moved, but the different language, behavior, secret handshakes, and views of each other I found across sectors. Xenophobia runs rampant within public, private, non-profit, and for-profit silos. Each silo has created its own world completely foreign to inhabitants from other sectors. Visiting emissaries are always viewed with skepticism. (“I’m from the government and I’m here to help …”)

One epiphany from my immersion into the non-private sector is how strenuously social sector organizations resist the notion they have a “business model.” Non-profits, government agencies, social enterprises, schools, and NGOs consistently proclaim that they aren’t businesses, and therefore business rules don’t apply.

Well, I’m sorry to break the news, but if an organization has a viable way to create, deliver, and capture value, it has a business model. It doesn’t matter whether an organization is in the public or private sector. It doesn’t matter if it’s a non-profit or a for-profit enterprise. All organizations have a business model. Non-profit corporations may not be providing a financial return to investors or owners, but they still capture value to finance activities with contributions, grants, and service revenue. Social enterprises may be mission-driven, focused on delivering social impact versus a financial return on investment, but they still need a sustainable model to scale. Government agencies are financed by taxes, fees, and service revenue, but are still accountable to deliver citizen value at scale.

Read More:https://hbr.org/2011/04/business-models-arent-just-for

Business Models

During my six years as an accidental bureaucrat, after spending twenty-five years in the private sector, my friends often wondered how I could do it. They routinely asked versions of the question: doesn’t government move too slowly for you? My standard reply was that, yes, the public sector moves slowly — but then, big companies don’t move so quickly either. And come to think of it, I teased my friends in higher education, colleges and universities move more slowly than either business or government! The point is, all institutions move slowly.

What surprised me wasn’t how slowly the different institutions moved, but the different language, behavior, secret handshakes, and views of each other I found across sectors. Xenophobia runs rampant within public, private, non-profit, and for-profit silos. Each silo has created its own world completely foreign to inhabitants from other sectors. Visiting emissaries are always viewed with skepticism. (“I’m from the government and I’m here to help …”)

One epiphany from my immersion into the non-private sector is how strenuously social sector organizations resist the notion they have a “business model.” Non-profits, government agencies, social enterprises, schools, and NGOs consistently proclaim that they aren’t businesses, and therefore business rules don’t apply.

Well, I’m sorry to break the news, but if an organization has a viable way to create, deliver, and capture value, it has a business model. It doesn’t matter whether an organization is in the public or private sector. It doesn’t matter if it’s a non-profit or a for-profit enterprise. All organizations have a business model. Non-profit corporations may not be providing a financial return to investors or owners, but they still capture value to finance activities with contributions, grants, and service revenue. Social enterprises may be mission-driven, focused on delivering social impact versus a financial return on investment, but they still need a sustainable model to scale. Government agencies are financed by taxes, fees, and service revenue, but are still accountable to deliver citizen value at scale.

Read More:https://hbr.org/2011/04/business-models-arent-just-for

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GET IN TOUCH

LETS START A JOURNEY

Main Office: Unit 4, 4Th Floor, Fakher Building , No.12, West Taban st., Nelson Mandela Boulevard, Tehran-Iran
Tel: +98 (21) 8867 8225 – Fax: +98 (21) 8608 2871
Email: info@fakher.ir
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